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Posts tagged ‘pride’

Hubris

A Word Study with Commentary

 

 

Definition 1: exaggerated pride or self-confidence

 

Source: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/hubris

 

 

Definition 2: excessive pride or self-confidence; arrogance.

 

Source: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/hubris

 

Definition 3: Overbearing pride or presumption; arrogance

 

Source: http://www.thefreedictionary.com/hubris

 

Definition 4: insulting, degrading treatment

 

Source: http://ancienthistory.about.com/od/heroicbehavior/g/Hubris.htm

 

 

The apostle Paul used the term “hubris” in the sense of Definition 4 (insulting, degrading treatment) in 2 Corinthians 12:10, where it is translated “reproaches” in the KJV.

 

2 Corinthians 12:10

Therefore I take pleasure in infirmities, in reproaches [Gr. hybris], in necessities, in persecutions, in distresses for Christ’s sake: for when I am weak, then am I strong.

 

Reproaches

Strong’s G1596 – hybris

ὕβρις

hybris

1) insolence

  1. a) impudence, pride, haughtiness

2) a wrong springing from insolence, an injury, affront, insult

3) mental injury and wantonness of its infliction being prominent

4) injury inflicted by the violence of a tempest

 

Source: http://www.blueletterbible.org/lang/lexicon/lexicon.cfm?Strongs=G5196&t=KJV

 

It appears that there were some who did not treat the great apostle with the appropriate amount of respect and decorum, and were apparently rude and insulting in their speech and in their behavior toward him. Who but the presumptuously foolish would so ill-treat such a true Man of God?

I observe that hubris in thought becomes hubris in word and in deed.

It is sad to know that among the list of the apostle’s personal perils is the category of “false brethren”.

2 Corinthians 11:26

In journeyings often, in perils of waters, in perils of robbers, in perils by mine own countrymen, in perils by the heathen, in perils in the city, in perils in the wilderness, in perils in the sea, in perils among false brethren;

As bad as the trauma imposed by thieves and robbers, as bad as the shameful treatment he received at the hands of his own countrymen—was the pain and suffering inflicted upon Paul by men who called themselves apostolic preachers, but who in reality were shameless charlatans and “hubristic” hypocrites, some of whom were deliberately saying insincere things from pulpits, hoping to make things worse for him.

Philippians 1:16

The one preach Christ of contention, not sincerely, supposing to add affliction to my bonds:

 

I sometimes shake my head in disbelief at the things “apostolic” preachers say about and do to their fellow brethren.

 

Incredible, unbelievable, unmistakable and undeniable hubris….

 

Pastor Tim D. Cormier
Apostolic Faith Tabernacle
03/05/2013

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Commentary on Daniel 4

This chapter of your Bible was written by Nebuchadnezzar, the King of Babylon.

He was by divine appointment the most powerful man on earth, the supreme ruler of the most powerful kingdom on earth.

We understand from the very Word of God Himself that Nebuchadnezzar was the “head of gold” in the prophetic image of his dream in Daniel 2, and the Babylonian Empire was superior to all successive human-ruled world empires (Dan. 2:38-39).

But because he was lifted up in PRIDE, the Supreme God of Heaven who had established him as the most powerful ruler on earth took from him his sanity and caused him to be driven out from his royal dwellings into the field, where he would live like a beast for 7 years!

Remember: God had made him the most powerful man on earth, the supreme ruler of the most powerful kingdom on earth.

We must never forget that our God is in control of everything that happens on this earth! There is no ruler or potentate that God cannot bring down from his lofty throne into the dust!

At the end of 7 years, Nebuchadnezzar was restored to his right mind (“my reason returned unto me”, v. 36) and made this most beautiful confession (v. 37):

“Now I Nebuchadnezzar praise and extol and honor the King of heaven, all whose works are truth, and his ways judgment: and those that walk in pride he is able to abase.”

This is something we should deeply consider and take to heart!

Much like the book of Jonah, this chapter is the autobiographical journal of a man who miserably fails God and suffers the horrendous consequences of his failure. But it also shows the great and tender mercy of the supreme God of Heaven, who restored both Jonah and Nebuchadnezzar and then prompted them to write their own stories for our edification and admonition.

Pastor Tim D. Cormier

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